J-Test – a Test of Practical Japanese

J Test vs. JLPT: What’s the Difference?

The J Test is a test begun in 1991 that, like the JLPT, aims at testing one’s Japanese proficiency. The J Test is considered a bit harder than the JLPT because of its focus on listening and writing skills as well as reading and vocabulary. Due to its nature, the J Test more accurately tests a person’s communicative proficiency than the JLPT, particularly for higher level learners of Japanese. Other key differences between the two tests are summarized below.

JLPT

J TEST

Cost ¥5,500 registration fee + ¥500 to buy application ¥3,600 registration fee for A-F levels;
¥4,500 for “Business J Test” level
When Held 2 times a year: July and December, at select locations around the world Held 6 times a year for A-D levels (Jan., March, May, July, Sept., and Nov.), and 3 times a year for E-F levels (March, July, Nov.) in Japan, China, Taiwan, Thailand, S. Korea, India, and Mongolia
Sections -Listening comprehension,
-Reading comprehension (grammar/vocab)
-Listening comprehension,
-Reading comprehension (grammar/vocab),
-Writing section
Levels N1 (highest) → N5 (lowest) A (highest) → F (lowest) and “Business J Test” for highest learning levels of Japanese
Scoring Scores are given out of 180 points:
N1 – overall 100 pts to pass, min. 19 pts in each section to pass
N2 – overall 90 pts with min. 19 pts in each section
N3 – overall 95 pts with min. 19 pts in each section
N4 – overall 90 pts with min. 38 pts in Reading and 19 pts in Listening
N5 – overall 80 pts with min. 38 pts in Reading and 19 pts in Listening
A-D levels
Scores given out of 1000 pts for 2 sections (must score min. 20% on each of the sections):
Special A* – 930 pts or higher
A* – 900-930 pts
Pre-A – 850-900 pts
B – 800-850 pts
Pre-B – 700-800 pts
C – 600-700 pts
D – 500-600 pts
E-F levels
Scores given out of 500 pts for 2 sections (must score min. 20% on each of the sections):
E – 350 pts or greater
F – 250-350 pts
Results About 2 months to receive results About a month to receive results

*Note: The Special A and A levels may be advertised as “Interpreter Level” but they do not provide you with an actual interpreter’s certification for Japanese.